Suicide Crisis

Suicide Crisis is a registered charity that runs an award-winning Suicide Crisis Centre in the UK. We provide intensive face-to-face support to individuals in suicidal crisis.

The work of our Suicide Crisis Centre has attracted international attention, including from the Ministry of Health in New Zealand. They approached us when they were devising their new national suicide prevention strategy. Subsequently they wrote to commend our work, described it as “inspiring” and informed us that our work “is supporting other work across the world.”

We provide a combination of Suicide Crisis Centre, home visits and emergency phone lines for individuals under our care.

We also provide suicide prevention training (which shares the methods, approach and ethos that we use at our Suicide Crisis Centre) across the UK. We have provided this training for NHS Trusts, the British Transport Police and charities.

We contribute to national and international suicide prevention initiatives.

How does your organisation contribute to preventing suicide and supporting those affected by it?

Suicide Crisis is a registered charity that runs a Suicide Crisis Centre in the UK. We provide intensive face-to-face support to individuals in suicidal crisis. We are on the front line, supporting individuals at risk of suicide.

It became clear to us in the first weeks of opening our Suicide Crisis Centre that we would need to provide more than a safe space for individuals in crisis to visit. One of our first clients was so traumatised that he was unable to leave his home. This showed us that we would need to go out to the homes of some individuals in crisis. We have no doubt that our ability to go out to clients in their own homes – sometimes in emergency situations – has saved lives. Not everyone would have been able to reach our Crisis Centre, at the point where they were at imminent risk of suicide.

We also provide emergency phone lines for clients under our care. These are not helplines – these are designated phone lines to call when someone is at immediate risk of suicide. There is a daytime and night time emergency phone line.

We also go out to see clients in other locations – particularly when we are informed that someone is at imminent risk of suicide.

As well as our work supporting individuals in crisis, we provide suicide prevention training for organisations across the UK, including the NHS and the British Transport Police. We share our unique methods, approach and ethos through this training. We also provide the training free of charge to carers groups across the UK (for family members of individuals who experience suicidal thoughts).

We contribute to national suicide prevention initiatives. Our CEO was recently invited to speak to a Parliamentary Select Committee about men and suicide (as part of their inquiry into men’s health). She was previously invited to speak to a Parliamentary Select Committee to share information about our Suicide Crisis Centre. The Select Committee was carrying out an inquiry into the measures needed to prevent suicide.

The founder and CEO of our charity was commissioned by a publisher to write two suicide prevention books which share our suicide prevention methods with the wider public. We have donated hundreds of copies of the most recent book (“The Suicide Prevention Guidebook: How To Support Someone Who Is Having Suicidal Feelings”) to prisons across the UK, community centres and hospitals as well as to overseas establishments such as Ukrainian libraries. Our founder has donated all her author royalties to our charity. She has received no payment herself from having written the book.

What are your current priorities?

Our current priorities are to continue to carry out the work that we have done over the past 12 years:

*supporting individuals in suicidal crisis
*providing training to help other people understand how to support people in crisis and *contributing to national and international suicide prevention initiatives.

What challenges are you currently facing?

We have relied heavily on public donations in previous years. Public support for our work has been wonderful. But the cost-of-living crisis has led to a significant drop in our income this year.